Five and a Half Lies a Day

In comments November 14, Ken West responded to a CNN story published this week contending that the president Donald J. Trump lies approximately 5.5 times per day in office.

“What happened to George Washington?” West said. “’I cannot tell a lie.’”

West answered his own question, speculating that the young Washington “probably got his butt kicked” by his father.

“It was probably just a little tree,” West said. “Why did he chop the tree down?”

West theorized that maybe the cherries were too high, and Washington was a “young, big-assed teenager” and wanted to reach the cherries.

“How did he chop it down?” West said. “Did he have a nuke?”

In any case, West noted that the story of the cherry tree is a famous anecdote promoting the first president’s character, also positing that, had America had a different initial leader, its resounding power as a first world democracy might not have been so strong.

“We’ve gone a long way from 1 to 45,” West said. “The truth is twirling on a twitter.”

West also made a vague stab at estimating the costs of a trip he said was made to “call somebody a rocket man,” saying taxpayers probably paid a billion dollars.

However, most of his criticism was reserved for the final days of the trip in which he said Trump met with Duterte, a known aggressor in his own country.

“He gets up in the morning, he goes ‘get me an Uzi, I’m gonna hunt a drug dealer,’” West said of Duterte. “They shoot him down, they say, well he was a drug dealer.”

West questioned how this kind of aggression plays to evangelicals.

“How are you going to come back and tell that to Christians?” West said.

Going back to his continuing study of what he called a “proxy war” in the Middle East, West seemed to conflate the standoff between the U.S. and North Korea with the Sunni-Shia conflict in MENA, suggesting that America might, in one scenario or another, find itself embroiled in a world war to end all world wars.

“I told you about the Chinese submarines,” West said.

Cataloguing his count of the numerous national world arsenals of nuclear weapons, West suggested that part of China’s arsenal may not be known to the west, and that others, such as Pakistan’s, may not be well secured. Issuing dire Cassandra warnings about various doomsday scenarios, West welcomed the news that in the U.S., legislators are currently holding hearings to determine whether the president’s nuclear weapon authorities should be curtailed.

 

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