Investigations, Clarifications and Technical Difficulties

Leading the Horse has been busy over the past few days, scouring the Internet for hard facts on the curious case of Michael Jones, while also struggling to maintain the site’s web hosting functionality.

 

On the morning of April 3, we found that the site had “stepped out for a bit” in the parlance of GoDaddy’s administrators. A follow-up call was unfruitful as the representative did not find us behind a computer after a lengthy wait time.

 

The next afternoon, we were able to speak with a technician who is the proud owner of a Bichon-King Cavalier dog, and who explained that for some reason, an earlier migration was not properly checked, which resulted in a second default of the site to hosting limbo. This individual spent about half an hour updating the managed WordPress URLs and other information and making the migration functional again for a fee of $13.99 in order to open up the defunct hosted location for an additional month – so that the valued content of the blog could be uploaded to a new location.

 

In the meantime, court documents for Michael Jones show that a hearing date of May 9 has been set. A grand jury trial is pending. The court documents that we saw did not contain any information about bail.

 

We also got some updates from Ken West, the initial source of the Jones story.

 

“He tortured me in the clink,” West said of the Charlottesville clapper, explaining that they call jail “the clink” or “the slammer” because of the sound the doors make when they close. Sound, he said, was very much an issue, as was some amount of sexual aggression. West clarified that although Jones did not attempt to become aggressive with him, he did introduce some “innuendo” that West found disconcerting.

 

Most of the problem, West said, was the noise.

 

“It’s loud,” West said.

 

Discussing his activism and advocacy for someone who also aggravated his own jailhouse experience, West said that Jones really does need some kind of mental help.

 

“He belongs in a mental hospital, not a jail cell,” West said.

 

In general, West said, Jones can be a threatening and imposing figure, and a disruption to peace and quiet.

 

Although the public defender’s office will not inform us further about Jones’s particular case (though we are eternally grateful to the nice individual who helped us to access the court web site), we’ll be watching the court website and looking for local coverage of this case.